Dr Gemma Clarke

BA (Hons) Sociology, MSc Social Research Methods with Gender, MPhil Criminological Research, PhD Law (Criminology).

Research Fellow

Phone: 0113 206 8520

Email:g.c.clarke@leeds.ac.uk

 

Gemma joined the group in August 2017 as part of the PROMs Workstream team for the Macmillan funded study: Comprehensive Patient Records (CPR) for Cancer Outcomes: A feasibility study. Macmillan CPR aims to securely link electronic non-identifiable information from hospital records to non-identifiable primary care data to examine outcomes in cancer survivorship. The PROMs Workstream team will collect patient reported outcome data from breast, colorectal and ovarian survivors to integrate with this dataset.

Before joining the group, Gemma worked as a Research Associate in the Palliative and End of Life Care Group, University of Cambridge on a study examining decision-making around eating and drinking for those with progressive neurological disease. Prior to this, she worked as a Research Assistant, for King’s College London on a study of young offenders, and completed her PhD in Criminology at Gonville and Caius College Cambridge in 2011.

Gemma has been a Visiting Researcher at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (2015), and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Library of Congress, Washington, DC (2008).

 

Research Interests

Patient reported outcomes; cancer survivorship; progressive neurological disease; decision-making capacity; dysphagia; nutrition and hydration; and undertaking sensitive research with vulnerable persons.

 

Presentations and Publications

  • Clarke, G., Fistein, E., Holland, A., Barclay, M., Theimann, P. and Barclay, S. (2017), ‘Preferences for care towards the end of life when decision-making capacity may be impaired: A large scale cross-sectional survey of public attitudes in Great Britain and the United States’, PLOS ONE, 12(4): e0172104.
  • Clarke, G., Galbraith, S., Woodward, J., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2016), ‘Chapter 9: Substituted or supported decisions? Examining models of decision-making within inter-professional team decision-making for individuals at risk of lacking decision-making capacity’ in Salloch, S. Sandow, V. Schildmann, J. and Vollmann, J. (Eds.) Ethics and Professionalism in Healthcare: Transition and Challenges, London Routledge; 113-125.
  • Clarke, G., Johnston, S., Corrie, P., Kuhn, I. and Barclay S. (2015), ‘Withdrawal of anticancer therapy in advanced disease: a systematic literature review’ in BMC Cancer, Nov 11;15:892.
  • Clarke, G., Galbraith, S., Woodward, J., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2015), ‘Eating and drinking interventions for people at risk of lacking decision-making capacity: who decides and how?’ in BMC Medical Ethics, 16: 41.
  • Clarke, G., Galbraith, S., Woodward, J., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2014), ‘Should they have a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy? The importance of assessing decision-making capacity and the central role of a multidisciplinary team’ in Clinical Medicine, June 1; 14 (3).
  • Clarke, G., Johnston, S., Corrie, P., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2014), ‘Stopping oral palliative anticancer treatment: International reflections upon difficult decision-making at the end of life. A systematic literature review and narrative synthesis: Abstracts of the 8th World Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC)’ in Palliative Medicine, June, Vol. 28, pp. 538-913.
  • Clarke, G., Johnston, S., Corrie, P., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2014), Difficult Decision-making at the End of Life: Stopping Oral Palliative Anticancer. A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis. Supportive and Palliative Care, 03/2014; 4 (Suppl_1):A27-A28.
  • Clarke, G., Harrison, K., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2013), ‘How are Treatment Decisions Made about Artificial Nutrition for Individuals at Risk of Lacking Capacity? A Systematic Literature Review’, in PLOS ONE, 8(4): e61475.
  • Clarke, G., Harrison, K., Holland, A. and Barclay, S. (2012), ‘Decisions regarding artificial nutrition for those at risk of lacking capacity: A systematic review’ in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care, 2: A16.